Female Rebellion by Will R. Barnes, To Date Cover Illustration c. November, 1895 via The New York Public Library
Let’s take a moment to acknowledge how incredibly suave the woman depicted in this illustration is. Between the hussar uniform and head-tilt sword wielding feminist imagery, she knows what it’s all about. 
Additionally, why are there no digitized editions of this magazine - why can’t we read their late nineteenth century opinions.
Observation: Kate Beaton - were you a late nineteenth century magazine illustrator? 

Female Rebellion by Will R. Barnes, To Date Cover Illustration c. November, 1895 via The New York Public Library

Let’s take a moment to acknowledge how incredibly suave the woman depicted in this illustration is. Between the hussar uniform and head-tilt sword wielding feminist imagery, she knows what it’s all about. 

Additionally, why are there no digitized editions of this magazine - why can’t we read their late nineteenth century opinions.

Observation: Kate Beaton - were you a late nineteenth century magazine illustrator? 

vintage history illustration victorian kate beaton feminism art

Miss Sanderson’s Parasol Self-Defense, 1908:
"Then Miss Sanderson came to the attack, and the demonstration showed her to be as capable with the stick as the sword. She passed it from hand to hand so quickly that the eye could scarcely follow the movements, and all the while her blows fell thick and fast. Down slashes, upper cuts, side swings, jabs and thrusts followed in quick succession, and the thought arose, how would a ruffian come off if he attacked this accomplished lady, supposing she had either walking-stick, umbrella, or parasol at the time? " 
- J. St. A. Jewell, “The Gymnasiums of London: Part X. — Pierre Vigny’s” Health and Strength, May 1904, pages 173-177. (via » Miss Sanderson and the womanly art of parasol self defence)

Miss Sanderson’s Parasol Self-Defense, 1908:

"Then Miss Sanderson came to the attack, and the demonstration showed her to be as capable with the stick as the sword. She passed it from hand to hand so quickly that the eye could scarcely follow the movements, and all the while her blows fell thick and fast. Down slashes, upper cuts, side swings, jabs and thrusts followed in quick succession, and the thought arose, how would a ruffian come off if he attacked this accomplished lady, supposing she had either walking-stick, umbrella, or parasol at the time? " 

- J. St. A. Jewell, “The Gymnasiums of London: Part X. — Pierre Vigny’s” Health and Strength, May 1904, pages 173-177. (via » Miss Sanderson and the womanly art of parasol self defence)

victorian self defense women history parasol vintage feminism 1900s