Lost Splendor

Past and present by an archives student and new Bostonian. @freifraufitz

Illustration via “The Woman with the Yellow Hair: a romance of good and bad society”, Published in London c. 1860 via the British Library on Flickr Commons
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"nm"
"m’lady"
Be Steady: "Armorial families : a directory of gentlemen of coat-armour", Published c. 1905 via Internet Archive Book Images
"Price list of transfer ornaments and painters’ supplies.", published 1876 via Internet Archive Book Images
The White Rabbit, The Nursery Alice by Lewis Carroll and Illustrated by Sir John Teniel, London c. 1890 via The British Library
Illustration via The history of the origin and rise of the Republic of Venice by William Hazlitt Care, Published in London c. 1858 via The British Library on Flickr Commons
Bestiary: Herons Eating Eels, England ca. 1230-1240 via The British Library on Flickr Commons

See Also: Pokémon Wiki, Dodrio
This Mysterious Apparition: Illustration by F.T. Janes published in "The Angel of the Revolution: a tale of the coming Terror", London c. 1893 via The British Library on Flickr Commons
The Earth Seen From The Moon: Published in “The Half Hour Library of Travel, Nature and Science for young readers”, London c. 1896 via The British Library on Flickr Commons
Illustration from When Life is Young, Published New York c. 1894 via The British Library on Flickr Commons
Lesson Time: Book Illustration by D. A. H. Drew, Published London c. 1899 via The British Library on Flickr Commons
Impending Fall semester realness.
Illustration from The Half Hour Library of Travel, Nature and Science for Young Readers, Published London c. 1896 via The British Library on Flickr Commons
Illustration by H. Stratton from Songs for Little People, Published London c. 1896 via The British Library on Flickr Commons
Bonnacon and Boar, Northumberland Bestiary c. 1250-1250 via Getty Open Content Program
When viewing this manuscript, you might consider the following: What variety of horrible exchange is going on in this manuscript? What unseemly creature am I seeing right now?
Let’s talk about the Bonnacon:
"The bonnacon (also called the bonacon or the bonasus) is a mythical animal from Asia. It has curled horns and when startled sprays acidic dung that burns on contact with skin “like a kind of fire”. The legend may be based on a type of bison in reality.” via Wikipedia, Bonnacon
Medieval manuscripts are serious business, guys. /throwing up hands in abandon

Bonnacon and Boar, Northumberland Bestiary c. 1250-1250 via Getty Open Content Program

When viewing this manuscript, you might consider the following: What variety of horrible exchange is going on in this manuscript? What unseemly creature am I seeing right now?

Let’s talk about the Bonnacon:

"The bonnacon (also called the bonacon or the bonasus) is a mythical animal from Asia. It has curled horns and when startled sprays acidic dung that burns on contact with skin “like a kind of fire”. The legend may be based on a type of bison in reality.” via Wikipedia, Bonnacon

Medieval manuscripts are serious business, guys. /throwing up hands in abandon

Interwoven Socks: The Saturday Evening Post, 1921 by J.C. Leyendecker via mattsko.wordpress.com
lostsplendor:

Easter Walk by J.C Leyendecker, April 6th, 1912 (via The Saturday Evening Post)

lostsplendor:

Easter Walk by J.C Leyendecker, April 6th, 1912 (via The Saturday Evening Post)