Lost Splendor

Past and present by an archives student and new Bostonian. @freifraufitz

Kenyan woman and chevrotain, Mombassa c. 1909 via imgur.com
Street View: Cincinnati, Ohio c. 1912 via Shorpy Historical Photo Archive
"Women picket during Ladies Tailors Strike", 1910 via U.S National Archives
"Men’s Collars and Neckties", c. early 1900s (by New York Public Library)

Miss Camille Clifford: Cigarette Card Portraits, c. 1889-1902 via The New York Public Library Digital Collections

(Source: digitalgallery.nypl.org)

So Extensive, So Well Balanced: Corset Advertisement, Ladies Home Journal, c. 1903. 

"HAVE NO BRASS EYELETS IT WOULD BE ABSURD"

I see that someone has some exceedingly strong opinions about eyelets.
Selfies of Historical Significance: Grand Duchess Anastasia Romanova, c. 1913.
 “All we know is that, thanks to a new camera and an old impulse, a teenage girl was able to gaze into a mirror, look into her own eyes, and capture her image for posterity.” (via 1913: Duchess Anastasia Takes a Selfie - Megan Garber - The Atlantic)

Detail of Easter for the Saturday Evening Post by J.C. Leyendecker, 1906.  (by Plum leaves)
Princess Marie Bonaparte of Greece, 1882-1962 via (gogm)
New York City Skyline, 1912 (via Shorpy Historical Photo Archive)

Paris Exposition, Champ de Mars, c. 1900 (by Brooklyn Museum)
Postcard Midsection, Cropped and Digitized. Postcard c. 1920s (via Poppies Pressed | Remembering the Great War in the Digital Age)
vintagegent:

Fall Style Book by Edward Penfield, 1893-1924 via The New York Public Library

vintagegent:

Fall Style Book by Edward Penfield, 1893-1924 via The New York Public Library

Parliament House Library, Brisbane c. 1906 (by State Library of Queensland, Australia)

(via Brothers in Arms: War, Whimsey, and Curiosity in the Wartime Postcard | Poppies Pressed)
Read more about the mysterious origins of this photograph and more about my ongoing World War I digitization project through the link above

(via Brothers in Arms: War, Whimsey, and Curiosity in the Wartime Postcard | Poppies Pressed)

Read more about the mysterious origins of this photograph and more about my ongoing World War I digitization project through the link above